AZURE API MANAGEMENT Your Way to Success

AZURE API MANAGEMENT Your Way to Success

Azure API Management provides a cloud-based API gateway for companies to expose their internal APIs to external consumers. It offers many features such as rate limiting, authentication, caching, logging, and monitoring.

Azure API Management is a great tool for exposing existing company data and applications to new markets or extending your reach to new customers. It’s flexible enough to work with any type of API – SOAP, REST, or even binary protocols – and can be used with a wide variety of back-end systems.

There are two ways to use Azure API Management: self-hosted on a virtual machine in your own data center, or as a cloud service hosted by Microsoft. Both options offer the same set of features, but the cloud service offers additional benefits such as scalability and high availability. You can check RemoteDBA for more information.

If you’re already using Azure, then the cloud service is the obvious choice. But if you’re not ready to make the move to the cloud, or if you have data that can’t be stored off-premises, then self-hosting may be a better option.

There are four steps to setting up Azure API Management:

1. Provision an Azure API Management instance in your subscription:

This creates the API Management service and provisioning takes a few minutes.

2. Configure one or more products:

A product defines a set of APIs that are exposed to developers.

3. Create one or more API proxies:

An API proxy is a facade for an existing backend API. It can be used to add features such as rate limiting, caching, authentication, and logging.

4. Publish the APIs to developers:

Developers can then use the APIs in their own applications.

Products:

Azure API Management products are used to group together a set of related APIs. For example, you could create a product called “Contoso Expenses” that includes an expense reporting API and an expense approval API.

Products are used to control access to the APIs. When you create a product, you specify who can access it and what level of access they have. For example, you could allow all developers to have read-only access to the expense reporting API, but only allow members of the finance team to have write access to the approval API.

You can also use products to control how your APIs are presented to developers. For example, you could include detailed documentation and sample code for the expense reporting API in the “Contoso Expenses” product, but only provide basic documentation for the approval API.

Creating an Azure API Management product is a two-step process:

  1. Create the product in the Azure portal.
  2. Add one or more APIs to the product.

Creating a product is a simple matter of giving it a name and description, and then deciding that should have access to it. You can give access to all developers, or you can restrict it to specific users or groups.

Adding an API to a product is just as easy. You simply select the API from the list of available APIs and then specify what level of access the developers who have access to the product should have.

When you’re done, you’ll have a product that contains all the APIs you want to expose, and that is only accessible to the developers you want to have access to it.

API Proxies:

An API proxy is a facade for an existing backend API. It can be used to add features such as rate limiting, caching, authentication, and logging.

Creating an API proxy is a two-step process:

  1. Configure the proxy in the Azure portal.
  2. Add one or more APIs to the proxy.

Configuring the proxy is simply a matter of giving it a name and description. You can also specify whether the proxy should be accessible to all developers, or only to specific users or groups.

Adding an API to the proxy is just as easy. You simply select the API from the list of available APIs and then specify what level of access the developers who have access to the product should have.

When you’re done, you’ll have a proxy that is only accessible to the developers you want to have access to it, and that contains all the APIs you want to expose.

Conclusion:

Self-hosting Azure API Management may be a better option if you’re not ready to move to the cloud, or if you have data that can’t be stored off-premises.

Rachel Morris